Category: Fishing
Fishing Creek Mouths

Creek mouths are some of the most productive places in the river to fish — if you understand what they are, and how they appear to the fish. Here are three thoughts to keep in mind.

  1. Water flows from the creek into the river. Since in can’t flow upstream the current will break towards the downstream side. If you’re looking for feeding fish keep this in mind. Almost nothing swims upstream if it can help it, especially small baitfish and the like. Fish with the current, not against it.
  2. As the water breaks downstream it slows. That means it drops sediment, brush and other things that make cover under the water. This cover producing material will be deposited in a crescent shape outside the creek mouth almost directly in line with the creek channel. This makes a great ambush point for predators — bass and flatheads. You’ll lose a lot of baits and terminal tackle fishing that mess but it’s well-worth it if you’re serious about catching fish.
  3. The action that’s been described above also digs out a deep hole — I know of two that are over 50 feet deep — in front of the crescent. It makes for a great resting place for bigger fish, especially giant catfish. Fishing in these deep holes is one of the secrets of trophy flathead and blue hunters. Use heavy weights to get down that deep and heavy tackle to pull big fish up from their dens. For whatever reason these holes seem to be more productive at night.

Think about all this as you motor into a creek and spend time following it back. Maybe the best fishing is over your shoulder.

 
Summer Stripers
TORStriper

For many, many years I fished thinking that the only fish worthy of catching was a largemouth bass; maybe an occasional smallmouth but never anything other than that.

For the last two or three years I have been working stripers and hybrids seriously, and here is why. They are school fish with excellent populations in the river and they fight like Mike Tyson. You see, the truth is that the river is at its best, at least in the Cincinnati area, as a center for stripers, hybrids, and catfish (especially flatheads).

Summertime brings the opportunity for main river stripers and hybrids from now through early winter. They can be caught not only in the early morning and late evening but also during peak periods of recreational boating. If the correct techniques are used they can be caught during the heat of the day with a blazing sun overhead in July and August.

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3 Great Ohio River Topwater Bass Baits

The river’s settled down. Things are getting back to normal. That means a solid, early morning June topwater bite. Most experienced river anglers carry these three baits with them as they launch in the early morning light.

1. A small, quarter-ounce popper

This is the first choice of nearly every angler. You can work it slow and easy, or fast and furious. Most anglers start slow and then work their way up until they’re splashing water everywhere trying to imitate a fleeing shad.

Throw it on monofilament or braided line. Avoid fluorocarbon. It’ll pull the nose of your popper down and ruin its action.

Color is largely a matter of personal preference. The most common choices are natural shad hues and solid black.

2. A standard size Zara Spook

No lure on the planet has caught more big bass than a spook. Walk it back to the boat. Change speeds and stop it occasionally only if a slow and steady retrieve isn’t working.

Color doesn’t matter so long as the belly is white with a touch of blue. It’s a rare situation in the Ohio River when a bass can see the back of the lure.

Don’t expect a lot of bites on a spook. It’s not a quantity fish bait. It’s a quality fish bait. With that in mind, don’t be afraid to spool-up with braid.

3. A buzzbait

There are squeakers and there are clackers. Some anglers swear by one and curse the other. Maybe it matters; maybe it doesn’t. Make your own choice.

The important thing here is to fish your buzzbait back in the heaviest, thickest stuff you can find. Always use braid, nothing else will handle the abuse.

This is a reaction bait. Color is not a very important consideration. That said, nearly every successful buzzbait anglers throws white, white and chartreuse or black. Most go with a single blade.

Fish any of these lures around creek mouths, cuts, backwater areas and anywhere you can find an inflow into the main river. And never think the water’s too shallow to hold a bass. It isn’t.